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Public toilets that are poorly located generate a sense of neglect, attracting vandalism, anti-social behaviour and social disorder. And lack of available and appropriate facilities at the right time encourages fouling, and treating diseases associated with open defecation such as typhoid, dysentery or cholera is a significant and costly task.

These issues, if not tackled effectively, can generate a cycle of decline, leading to more entrenched social problems, and seriously impairing quality of place and quality of life for local people.

Others have seen this reality before. HIGHWAY ACT 1980 Part VII Provision of Special Facilities for Highways states that “…112 Provision of picnic sites and public conveniences for users of trunk roads (1) The Minister may provide on land adjoining, or in the vicinity of, a trunk road that is not a special road a picnic site for motorists and others likely to use the road with space for parking vehicles and a means of access to and from a highway. An area of any such land as aforesaid in which there are, or are to be, provided such a picnic site, parking space and means of access as aforesaid is in this Act referred to as a “trunk road picnic area “.

“(2) The Minister may erect buildings and execute works on a trunk road picnic area for the purpose of providing all or any of the following:— (a) parking places for vehicles, (b) a means of access to or from the area from or to a highway, (c) public sanitary conveniences (including lavatories), and…”

“…(5) The Minister may provide public sanitary conveniences (including lavatories) in proper and convenient situations on or under land forming part of a trunk road that is not a special road, or adjoining, or in the vicinity of, such a road and may manage such conveniences…”

The extent to which people have easy access to good quality toilets affects their general health and well being – and that of the whole community. Enabling different people, with different needs, to make use of public toilets at different times can have a significant impact on issues like public health and exercise, public behaviour, use of public transport.

A lack of clean, accessible and safe toilets impacts on some people more than others. Some people may feel unable or reluctant to leave their homes and visit areas where they fear they will not be able to find a public toilet. Older people, mothers, fathers, and carers with young children, disabled people and people with chronic health problems – all need easy access to suitably equipped public toilet facilities.

Lack of toilet facilities at the right time in the right place contributes to dirty water and farms that are unsanitary, unpleasant and can spread infection. Farmers will fall sick and they will not be able to work and meet their obligations.

Dear BDBA,

Understandably, BDBA was designed not only to be open but also to be attractive to businesses.

Family businesses have connections with their local area going back generations – BDBA project is an opportunity for them to increase their level of the connection.

National and International chains, on the other hand, often have a strong social or community support ethos as part of their corporate policy, providing free or subsidised goods and services – and sometimes funding too – for local initiatives. They operate as part of communities and hold as much of a stake in supporting local projects and promoting civic pride as the locals themselves.

If BDBA project is not the kind that can lift our dignity, it cannot attract businesses.

The foregoing aside, why should BDBA project be similar to CBO projects?

 

The filters will be cased in either concrete or plastic shafts.

Rainwater from the drained area is fed into the inlet (marker 1), which is at the lower end of the shaft. A deflector plate sets up a radial flow.

At place marked 2, sedimentation of particles, especially the sand faction and above, takes place in the hydrodynamic separator. This is due to turbulent secondary flows within a radial laminar flow regime.

The settlable solids are collected at point marked 3 via an opening in the silt trap chamber. This chamber is evacuated periodically, via the by-pass central tube at intervals.

Four filter elements are located within the filter shaft (part marked 4). As waters flow upwards the finer particles are filtered out, whilst the dissolved pollutants are precipitated and absorbed. The filter is easily backwashed, and if completely clogged or exhausted, is easily replaced (often once per year).

At point marked 5, is clean water above the filter elements passing to discharge via an oil trap assembly. In the event of major spill, free floating oils etc are retained here. Normal concentrations of dissolved oils are retained within the filter elements.

“Kenya Roads Board acknowledges that the task (RaHa has) been assigned is a nobble one and important”

KBR EXECUTIVE DIRECOR

Eng. Jacob Z. Ruwa, OGW

The assignment referred to is installing SANI SOLAR toilets on roads, to be used free of charge, in line with recent directive by the Kenya Ministry of Health aiming to improve public access to better quality toilets.

This Madaraka Day, we were invited to renovate toilets that have been used for only 6 years. 6 years is a very short period of time for toilets to require renovation. Something must have been done wrongly.

To avoid making the same mistake, we ask: what happened, especially to the walls and floors?

A lack of good toilets affects not only the quality of our schools, it also reduces the dignity and quality of our lives. After all, they are one of the basic facilities that we depend on. Good quality provision instils confidence in public facilities as a whole, helps to inspire positive impressions, and contributes to many other important aspects of life.

It is important that children have the confidence that the facilities they need are available when they are in school – children rightly expect accessible, clean, safe and well maintained toilets.

Yesterday, Ben Phillips twitted “No one is coming in a cape, coming from outside, to save us. But together we can save ourselves.” “There is no justice, just us. That might sound sad at first but there is a huge power in “us”.”

When you nominate the water starved for water, toilet-less for toilets,… etc; others will promote rainwater harvesting and rainwater protection; and the your nominee gets water and or toilet. If you are an organization, your nominee gets water and toilets when you Makerainsafe for you.

Ben is Launch Director of the Fight Inequality Alliance. He was Campaigns and Policy Director for Oxfam and ActionAid International. He has lived and worked in four continents and 11 cities including New Delhi and Washington DC, as well as with children in poverty in East London. He has led programmes and campaigns teams in Save the Children, the Children’s Society, the Global Call to Action Against Poverty and the Global Campaign for Educationd.

He began his development work at the grassroots, as a teacher and ANC activist living in Mamelodi township, South Africa, in 1994, just after the end of apartheid.

He is based in Nairobi.

Wakili Samuel Keter (on left on photo) nominates himself for RainSafe to #FightInequality. With the RainSafe, he will #makerainsafe for himself so that the municipal water he currently uses may be used by the underserves. 

Additionally, he nominates Lelaitich settlement scheme in Soin Ward, Sigowet/Soin Constituency Kericho District because they are a water starved village. Due to this nomination, Lelaitich will get a rain water harvesting system as solution to their water starvation.

Representatives of Lelaitich, Johana Mutai, Elisha Yegon, Joshua Kirwa, Benson Cheptiony and David Mutai agree to prepare the foundation and provide all unskilled labor required.

Samuel and the representatives propose that the County Government of Kericho should also #FightIequality by marking the solutions with their name or logo free of charge. Lelaitich will get the solution as soon as County Government of Kericho agrees to mark the solution.

We acknowledge the big contribution from Aiesec UoN towards #FightInequality. They are influencing organizations to #makerainsafe, consume the safe rainwater and even allow others to use their (organizations’) excess safe rainwater. When the organisations (eg hotels, banks, mobile phone service provider etc) do this, they free a lot of municipal water. The free water is used by the underserved communities at a much lower price.

Allowing others to use their excess safe rainwater reduces use of plastic water bottles, which end up blocking drains, among other things. Needless to say that flooding within towns and cities is partly due to the plastic bottles.

Aiesec UoN does #FightIequality in this manner on twitter – they are writing personalised posts and sharing the posts widely. They are also ‘carrying placards’, writing ordinary letters as a group, holding face to face meetings with representatives of the organizations etc

To #makerainsafe is at no cost to the organizations. It is an opportunity for the organizations to #FightInequality in a huge way.