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In this last desperate sprint to the finish — following searing pain associated with the development of plan to AccelerateUHC in middle- & low-income countries (LICs & LMICs) — we are realising with startling clarity that there is nothing more we can do to the plan. Except for one thing. We have to abandon all doubt about it. We have to trust absolutely that a marketing team should now start the plan’s implementation process.

We are trusting the team (in photo) not just believing but knowing that it will be there for us. It has just been trained on how to accelerateUHC with adverts. It will pass on to businesses the knowledge it got during the training.

Desperate sprint because, even with public health insurance available since 1966, only 20% of Kenyans have access to some sort of medical coverage. With the population at over 44 million and rising, it means that as many as 35 million Kenyans are excluded from quality health care coverage.

In Kenya, like in other LICs & LMICs; 70% of the population lives in rural and peri urban areas (RPUA); 95% doctors, 75% dispensaries and 95% hospitals are in urban areas; 60-80% private practitioners are semi or un-qualified; and, absenteeism rate can be as high as 60% at government clinics in RPUA.

An average person in RPUA pays for ~99% of his/her healthcare costs out-of-pocket. His/her healthcare cost is approximately twice the healthcare cost of his/her average urbanised compatriot. This disparity is partly because he/she is transported to an urban area hospital for healthcare very late in his/her disease-cycle. By the time of this transportation, he/she must, at a minimum, be accompanied by caregiver(s).

This is the first payment we got this month : “Hello Kadu, …Been in the village to bury my grandma. Then my Aunty also passed away. Still at the village. Burial is on Saturday. Will definitely action on the water tank or borehole. You will never know how handy the well is. Kitui is super dry. God bless you.

You may have read our previous updates that we’re participating in fundraising to Help Build Latrines for others –– while giving toilets, reusable sanitary towels, water and medical cover to villages and schools that you care about.

We really do need your support, especially your in-kind support.

To date, we’ve raised $20.00 CAD but we still have a way to go to reach our target goal of $50,000.00 CAD. We can assure you that World Vision uses the funds in building latrines.

Your generosity would be greatly appreciated and no amount is too little. Just click on the link below and it will take you to our Pledge Page. To support in kind, click HERE.

If you can’t afford a donation, pledge your support by sending this e-mail to friends, family or colleagues.

Thank you in advance for your support.

UHC PADS FOR MWASERE GIRLS’ HIGH SCHOOL

Phoebe supports Mwasere with small part of her time –– by doing this she is donating time equivalent to about $ 1000 plus 5% of $1000 ($ 50). The $ 1000 goes directly to this cause and the $50 goes to World Vision.

See more about this cause.

 


“You decide what’s possible. Where others see a mountain, you see a summit. What they call the daily grind, you call the chance to prove yourself. When they say it can’t be done, you ask when you can start. You are going big and you are not going home. They see a child in poverty. You see dignity, beauty and hope. They say it’s a lost cause. But you can’t hear them over the sound of pushing all your chips in. The thing is, you’re never a world-changer. Until you are.” (Word Vision, Canada)

 

We couldn’t be more excited to share this news with you — just moments ago, Elmouhib Imane joined us.
She said ” I am Imane, I came from Morocco to work with RaHa Solution. I always had interest in water preservation. For me, coming to Kenya is a great opportunity to know more about the issues that people are facing when it comes to getting clean water, sanitation and hygiene services. I have come to work in order to improve their living standard.
I can’t wait to leave an impact in Kenya.”

You are like-d by the village around Makindu Primary School. They want you to mark their rainwater harvesting tank as illustrated above, for free, see more details here. When you agree, they get water which they currently have little of. When you agree, you will also enable many more similar schools and villages to get water and toilets.

Regards,

RaHaSolutions

Public toilets that are poorly located generate a sense of neglect, attracting vandalism, anti-social behaviour and social disorder. And lack of available and appropriate facilities at the right time encourages fouling, and treating diseases associated with open defecation such as typhoid, dysentery or cholera is a significant and costly task.

These issues, if not tackled effectively, can generate a cycle of decline, leading to more entrenched social problems, and seriously impairing quality of place and quality of life for local people.

Others have seen this reality before. HIGHWAY ACT 1980 Part VII Provision of Special Facilities for Highways states that “…112 Provision of picnic sites and public conveniences for users of trunk roads (1) The Minister may provide on land adjoining, or in the vicinity of, a trunk road that is not a special road a picnic site for motorists and others likely to use the road with space for parking vehicles and a means of access to and from a highway. An area of any such land as aforesaid in which there are, or are to be, provided such a picnic site, parking space and means of access as aforesaid is in this Act referred to as a “trunk road picnic area “.

“(2) The Minister may erect buildings and execute works on a trunk road picnic area for the purpose of providing all or any of the following:— (a) parking places for vehicles, (b) a means of access to or from the area from or to a highway, (c) public sanitary conveniences (including lavatories), and…”

“…(5) The Minister may provide public sanitary conveniences (including lavatories) in proper and convenient situations on or under land forming part of a trunk road that is not a special road, or adjoining, or in the vicinity of, such a road and may manage such conveniences…”

We are thrilled to announce that we have today submitted to Billion Dollar Business Alliance (BDBA) our offer to build filters next to water ponds that BDBA are currently building in Kenya.

Our offer is based on fact that cleaning of water is not part of activities BDBA is doing. They are harvesting rainwater for agriculture and, apparently, they assumed that farmers would not use the water for domestic purposes. Our contribution to the BDBA project will enable beneficiaries of the ponds to use the water for drinking as well – for a large number of the beneficiaries, this will be their only water source.

We have also offered to build toilets in toilet-less homes and along roads that are within areas that drain water to the ponds. This will reduce pollution of water that will end up in the ponds. The SANI SOLAR toilets sun dry faeces and urine to form fertiliser that the farmers will need.

We sent our offer through BDBA’s Maimbo M. Malesu of World Agroforestry Centre (ICRAF). ICRAF, WFP and Government of Kenya are members of the BDBA.

“Kenya Roads Board acknowledges that the task (RaHa has) been assigned is a nobble one and important”

KBR EXECUTIVE DIRECOR

Eng. Jacob Z. Ruwa, OGW

The assignment referred to is installing SANI SOLAR toilets on roads, to be used free of charge, in line with recent directive by the Kenya Ministry of Health aiming to improve public access to better quality toilets.

Businesses respond to motivations. Businesses operate as part of communities and hold as much of a stake in supporting local community amenities and promoting civic pride as the locals themselves.

Family businesses and independents, for instance, may have connections with their local area going back generations. SANI SOLAR public toilets will make such businesses to remain connected with their local area.

Transport operators – like any commercial business – will only make the most of their commercial opportunities if there are public toilets that their passengers demand, many times quietly. 

International and national chains, on the other hand, often have a strong social or community support ethos as part of their corporate policy. Opportunities to provide free services and, sometimes, funding for local community initiatives motivates them – and public toilets provide the opportunity. 

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